• cosner

    Breaking the cycle

    Monday, March 10, 2014

    Under a makeshift cardboard roof on a sidewalk sits a man bundled up with a sad excuse for a blanket. His hands are dirty and his unshaven face is burrowed under his arm, which is holding a sign to convince passersby to stop and help. The situation is one that Americans have become somewhat accustomed to witnessing. While poverty and homelessness may seem distant to most, it knocks daily on 45-year-old Terry Cosner’s front door — if he had one. “Not all homeless people are…

  • Blot—Math-040

    Falling for math

    Monday, March 10, 2014

    Over the years, University of Idaho math graduate student Jesse Oldroyd has developed a severe mistrust of threes. He likes fives much better, and feels that sevens are weird. Oldroyd, a native to Anchorage, Alaska, has been at UI for four years in the mathematics graduate program. While attending the University of Alaska, Oldroyd originally planned to study Spanish — because he was not a fan of math in high school, but liked languages. As an undergraduate, Oldroyd discovered his love of math in an…

  • women

    Where are the women?

    Monday, March 10, 2014

    Almost half of the assistant professors at the University of Idaho this year are female. More than a third of associate professors are women, the next rank among academic faculty. At the top tier — full-fledged professors — women make up less than a quarter of about 270 professors on salary at UI. Academic faculty hierarchy and the tenure process are among some of the oldest institutions in the already ancient bureaucracy of academia. Tenure-track faculty members arrive as assistant professors and begin a six-year…

Featured

Bagel Shop-2

One day at the Bagel Shop

Shilo Storey and Halle Gilbert: On a rainy Saturday afternoon, Shilo Storey and Halle Gilbert had driven downtown just for bagels. Gilbert and her friend, Storey, had both wanted to grab something to eat, and the first place they thought of was the Moscow Bagel Shop and Deli. The two University of Idaho students often frequent the downtown restaurant. “It’s my favorite lunch place,” Storey said. That day, however, Storey was more interested in a late breakfast. Since the bagel shop serves all its bagels…

Clock Tower-2

Idaho’s music clock

The University of Idaho clock tower, an almost European old-world icon in Idaho, wouldn’t have its charm without the music that rings daily from the carillon music player. “The carillon adds a great deal to the character of our campus,” said Jenny Warner, an administrative assistant at the Lionel Hampton School of Music. “There’s nothing like standing out in the snow and hearing the music — it’s magical, actually.” The carillon arrived at UI thanks to a $38,000 donation that filled the campus with music…

bukvich

Vandal for 38 years

It’s been 38 years, and the fingerprints are still high on the wall in the corner of his office. Dan Bukvich recalls the day they were put there. He had just ascended the back stairs of the Lionel Hampton School of Music and reached the main landing for the first time. Bukvich was a graduate student, fresh out of the University of Montana’s music program. It was 1976. As he looked for the main offices, he noticed a single office door open  invitingly. Bukvich stopped…

deferred

Deferred consequences

It’s hard to comprehend why a tattered Depression-era farmhouse would house a world-class research institute. But that is the situation the University of Idaho’s Aquaculture Research Institute has found itself in because of the disappearing maintenance funding from the state, said Keith Ickes, UI executive director of planning and budget. “It’s an old farmhouse, it is in need of repair, it needs a new roof, it needs new facilities and it’s developing mold in certain areas,” Ickes said. “We are doing 21st century science in…

Recent Comments

    The fine print

    Blot is a registered trademark of University of Idaho Student Media. All rights reserved. The magazine is published twice a semester and printed in Spokane, Wash. The first issue is free.